infineon4engi@twitter infineon4engineers infineon@linkedin infineon@youtube
twitter Facebook Linkedin Youtube

Banner_MOSFET_SiC Banner_Schottky_Diodes Banner_GateDriver_MOSFETS_SiC Banner_CoolSiC_Hybrid_Modules Banner_automotive_applications


+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Information on measurement techniques of high-speed voltage and current waveforms

  1. #1
    Beginner Beginner powergeek is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    3
    Points
    85

    Information on measurement techniques of high-speed voltage and current waveforms

    Hi, I have a question, is there any information on measurement techniques of high-speed voltage and current waveforms?

  2. #2

    Infineon Employee
    Infineon Employee
    Expert
    史威 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    11
    Tektronix, Lecory have released the voltage probes focus on the SiC component ,you can check it in their webpage.
    For the current testing , the shunt resistor can be used here or detect the current directly by the Rogowski Coil from PEM http://www.pemuk.com/

  3. #3
    Beginner Beginner nick is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    9
    Points
    65
    Many thanks for the Infos so far, I have a further topic as I need to perform a non-inductive drain current measurement. How can this be done?

  4. #4

    Infineon Employee
    Infineon Employee
    Expert
    electricuwe is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    28
    There is no simple answer to this question. The optimum solution depends on the current range and if you are considering a dedicated device characterization board or a measurement within an existing application.

    Within an existing application usually the only current measurement that can be introduced without significant change of the structure is a Rogowski coil. This does not add inductance, but suffers from delay, limited bandwidth and
    dV/dt induced disturbance.


    In a dedicated characterization setup for low currents a coaxial shunt can be an attractive solution. Here you have to distinguish between internal series inductance (relevant for the bandwidth) and insertion inductance (limiting the di/dt you can achieve in the setup). So later one is dependent on how you integrate the shunt into your setup and it is rarely specified in the datasheet.


    A characterization setup for higher current devices would most probably use pulse current transformers if you intend to use an off the shelf solution. Insertion inductance ins mainly governed by the way how you integrate the sensor into your setup, bandwidth by the number of windings, hence the transfer ratio) There are many publications on more advanced measurement methods, but then you would have to spend a lot of work on manufacturing and calibrating the sensor yourself.
    The views expressed here are my personal opinions, have not been reviewed or authorized by Infineon and do not necessarily represent the views of Infineon.

  5. #5
    New Member New Member neelsama is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    1
    Points
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by electricuwe View Post
    There is no simple answer to this question. The optimum solution depends on the current range and if you are considering a dedicated device characterization board or a measurement within an existing application.

    Within an existing application usually the only current measurement that can be introduced without significant change of the structure is a Rogowski coil. This does not add inductance, but suffers from delay, limited bandwidth and
    dV/dt induced disturbance.


    In a dedicated characterization setup for low currents a coaxial shunt can be an attractive solution. Here you have to distinguish between internal series inductance (relevant for the bandwidth) and insertion inductance (limiting the di/dt you can achieve in the setup). So later one is dependent on how you integrate the shunt into your setup and it is rarely specified in the datasheet.


    A characterization setup for higher current devices would most probably use pulse current transformers if you intend to use an off the shelf solution. Insertion inductance ins mainly governed by the way how you integrate the sensor into your setup, bandwidth by the number of windings, hence the transfer ratio) There are many publications on more advanced measurement methods, but then you would have to spend a lot of work on manufacturing and calibrating the sensor yourself.
    What kind of differential probes would you recommend/ do you use for measuring high side MOSFET gate and drain-source waveform?

  6. #6

    Infineon Employee
    Infineon Employee
    Expert
    electricuwe is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    28
    We have used Bumblebee probes from PMK and IsoVu from Tektronix for measurement of highside gate signals. Highside drain source voltage measurement is less critical in regard to CMRR and could be done also with other non-optical differential probes.
    The views expressed here are my personal opinions, have not been reviewed or authorized by Infineon and do not necessarily represent the views of Infineon.

+ Reply to Thread
Disclaimer

All content and materials on this site are provided as is. Infineon makes no warranties or representations with regard to this content and these materials of any kind, whether express or implied, including without limitation, warranties or representations of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, title and non-infringement of any third party intellectual property right. No license, whether express or implied, is granted by Infineon. Use of the information on this site may require a license from a third party, or a license from Infineon.


Infineon accepts no liability for the content and materials on this site being accurate, complete or up- to-date or for the contents of external links. Infineon distances itself expressly from the contents of the linked pages, over the structure of which Infineon has no control.


Content on this site may contain or be subject to specific guidelines or limitations on use. All postings and use of the content on this site are subject to the Usage Terms of the site; third parties using this content agree to abide by any limitations or guidelines and to comply with the Usage Terms of this site. Infineon reserves the right to make corrections, deletions, modifications, enhancements, improvements and other changes to the content and materials, its products, programs and services at any time or to move or discontinue any content, products, programs, or services without notice.